Guinevere

While researching some Goddesses I got a book just on Guinevere from the library. It is a nice book but didn’t really get the real portion of her that I was searching for. By piecing together other sources I have found that she is worthy of honoring in a ritual because of who she was and not really what she may have done (her affair with Lancelot).

After she married King Arthur she began to feel useless because she is not able to bear children. She takes up a love affair with Lancelot on of the knights. I was sort of feeling as if she was having an affair and why is she worthy of honoring at all. I think there is a need to remember that these times were very different than today. We can’t judge those people by our own standards. The versions of her story are really not flattering. There was a piece of information I found online somewhere that reasons the stories “demean the status of the sovereign Goddess in their telling. She was the sovereign who gave Arthur his right to rule simply by being with him. When she left him he pursued her not for love, but because without her his kingdom would crumble for lack of leadership. The role of Goddess of sovereignty is more clearly seen in her legends than in many others. Her duty is to blend the king’s energy with the energy of the land. It is in many myths that when the king forgets where his power comes from that the queen will seek other champions and lovers to remind him as she gladly did.”

She was a leader of the kingdom in some ways and was also in charge of the love affair by some accounts with Lancelot. Because when she was married she was not in love with Arthur and it was an arranged marriage it seems almost understandable for her to have found true love elsewhere. She was more concerned with the safety of her knights than with her own.

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One thought on “Guinevere

  1. you know, I never really associated the concept of the queen/goddess as the unifying energy between the “King” and “Land” though now that I think of it, that connection is evident in quite a few sources and stories I can remember outside of the Arthurian Myths.
    Very interesting!!

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